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-   -   Brake Upgrade (https://forum.mazda6club.com/3rd-gen/422641-brake-upgrade.html)

tickerguy 09-25-2017 02:45 PM

If you don't perform maintenance you should expect poor performance.

Caliper pins do require lube but if the bellows are in good condition contamination and degradation is usually not an issue over the life of the pads assuming the bore is cleaned out and the pins are properly lubed when the pads are changed. The exception is people who frequently drive in the mountains or in a track environment; in the former case it's probably a good idea to do it semi-annually or annually, and in the latter it's basically essential after every session (and in that case it's not just the caliper pins that require inspection either; there fluid changes and frequently even pad and rotor changes are required on a per-session basis.)

Get Inline 10-13-2017 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tickerguy (Post 4905009)
If you don't perform maintenance you should expect poor performance.

Caliper pins do require lube but if the bellows are in good condition contamination and degradation is usually not an issue over the life of the pads assuming the bore is cleaned out and the pins are properly lubed when the pads are changed. The exception is people who frequently drive in the mountains or in a track environment; in the former case it's probably a good idea to do it semi-annually or annually, and in the latter it's basically essential after every session (and in that case it's not just the caliper pins that require inspection either; there fluid changes and frequently even pad and rotor changes are required on a per-session basis.)

another situation where you would want to lube the pins frequently is if you live in a cold/snowy area, especially a place that salts the roadways during the winter. at 75k miles, my rear calipers on the BMW were in sorry shape and the pins were bone-dry.

b1lk1 10-13-2017 05:06 PM

Up in the rust belts, you simply must lubricate the caliper pins yearly. Even if you garage them up here, you're nuts if you don't regularly pull them apart to clean and regrease. I do mine when I switch my tires to winters/summers. Twice a year, takes me very little time and my brakes have worn great. I had to change 3 calipers when I first bought the car 3 years ago because they had locked pins that I would have to have used a torch to loosen. I hate to admit I never actually bled the system outside of gravity bleeding as I was alone when I changed them, but I have a method I use that seems to work very well as I have a rock hard pedal that modulates extremely well. I would never bleed brakes like this on someone else's car, but I take some things for granted on my own car as I have been a mechanic for almost 30yrs.

People simply don't maintain their brakes anywhere near as well as we should. I read so many stories here on this very forum of people refusing to have the service done for various reasons (mostly to save $$$) and they soon after seem to have issues.

Almost all brake wear issues are from improper service and lack of any service between brake jobs.

Clay Easton 10-19-2017 08:43 PM

I have a 2014 Sport. The original rotors warped BADLY by 20K miles. I put up with it for another 25K miles. I ended up going to Pep Boys and had them swap out my front rotors and pads for a total of $350 after rebates. Pads were Wagner, no idea who made the rotors. No issues since then.

The OEM rotors were pure crap.

jcme0557 10-20-2017 06:30 AM

I'm starting to get some pedal pulsation at 26k. I'll probably hang a set of Centric coated plain rotors and ceramic pads sometime this winter. I've had good luck with Centric brake parts in the past.

I don't know if they qualify as an "upgrade" or not?

Byakuya 10-20-2017 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jcme0557 (Post 4912697)
I'm starting to get some pedal pulsation at 26k. I'll probably hang a set of Centric coated plain rotors and ceramic pads sometime this winter. I've had good luck with Centric brake parts in the past.

I don't know if they qualify as an "upgrade" or not?

Anything is an upgrade from those crap OEM ones lol.

I've been running Centric rotors and pads up front for about 60k miles and they're only now starting to get a little bit of wobble when I brake moderately at high speeds.

Been running them in the back for about 10k no issues.

For the price, they have a good amount of stopping power.

nobios 10-29-2017 06:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by b1lk1 (Post 4910033)
Up in the rust belts, you simply must lubricate the caliper pins yearly. Even if you garage them up here, you're nuts if you don't regularly pull them apart to clean and regrease. I do mine when I switch my tires to winters/summers. Twice a year, takes me very little time and my brakes have worn great. I had to change 3 calipers when I first bought the car 3 years ago because they had locked pins that I would have to have used a torch to loosen. I hate to admit I never actually bled the system outside of gravity bleeding as I was alone when I changed them, but I have a method I use that seems to work very well as I have a rock hard pedal that modulates extremely well. I would never bleed brakes like this on someone else's car, but I take some things for granted on my own car as I have been a mechanic for almost 30yrs.

People simply don't maintain their brakes anywhere near as well as we should. I read so many stories here on this very forum of people refusing to have the service done for various reasons (mostly to save $$$) and they soon after seem to have issues.

Almost all brake wear issues are from improper service and lack of any service between brake jobs.

Been there too... When I still had my Corolla the pins needed to be changed every year after the first five years. If the rubber seal goes bad once the pin hole starts to corrose and then you just have to replace the pins because they catch the rust from the pin hole. Someone once suggested to use copper paste to lubricate them and that was the worst advice I've ever listened. The pins started to get stuck after a while and I had to flush the hole with brake cleaner few times to get the copper paste out. Only use the appropriate lube for pins! This stuff usually comes with the set.

I've learned couple of tricks over the years about how to keep brakes in good condition. It's good for the brakes when you hit the pedal hard few times once in a while. Like once a month or so. The car doesn't need to be moving during this. If you always brake lightly the calibers will get stuck at some point because they don't travel far enough. Because of the brake balance the rear brakes don't necessarily move at all if the pedal is pressed lightly and this certainly causes them to get stuck. Also, you want to replace the pads before there is only few millimeters (1 mm = 3/64 of inch) left of them. It feels like a waste of money but I've learned that worn out pads can cause the brakes to get stuck. In some magical way the calibers won't return as well as with good pads. I replace my pads when there's about 1/3 left of them.

tickerguy 10-29-2017 09:48 AM

The problem with running the pads all the way down is that the bore of the caliper can corrode on the part of it that no longer has a piston in it. This is especially the case if you don't flush the brake fluid every 2 years (which, incidentally, is WHY the European makers require it.)

Then when you change the pads and retract the piston the now-corroded surface of the caliper bore damages the piston and now it leaks; thus you now must buy a new caliper!

Thus "don't do that" -- in other words flush your brake fluid every 2 years. It takes under an hour if you have a pump-up power bleeder such as the Motive (which isn't very expensive.)

BTW if you think changing calipers is a pain in the neck and somewhat expensive not flushing the brake fluid on modern cars can also cause the ABS pump to fail. That can be a pain in the neck to change (especially if you don't have the service tool to cause it to run for flushing the air out of the new one) and it's also quite expensive.

jcme0557 10-30-2017 07:36 AM

Every year the s*** they spread on the roads up here (salt, sand, gravel, and salt) seems to get worse and worse. I have grease the slide pins, pad backing plate edges and backs, inside the rotor top hats, hub flanges, wheel flanges, studs. And still stuff gets rusty and corrodes and needs to be beaten/heated off and replaced. I've heard of 10-15 year old domestic cars literally rusting in half in Green Bay...just like it was in the 1970's

Never buy a used car from No. Wisconsin.

Byakuya 10-30-2017 07:49 AM

Honestly, while the salt/sand/gravel aren't good for your car, it's the brine solution that's doing the greatest amount of corrosion. It's also the most efficient and cost-effective method for pre-treating roads, so more an more places are using it. That stuff touches everything on your car and takes a lot to get rid of.


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